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Tripping the Light Fantastic with Hugh McSpedden

Hugh McSpeddon 1

Well not tripping exactly or even dancing for that matter, but "light fantastic", without a doubt.  The exterior of St Andrews Hall was transformed a treat with Hugh McSpedden's trademark light projections for The Light Show last Friday night. From my initial vantage point (across the road at A Boy Named Sue, enjoying the best pizza) the whole scene looked magical. There were audible gasps in the restaurant when Hugh fired up his generator and bathed the building in light for the first time.

Hugh McSpeddon 4

Hugh is a local legend.  When I first came to the area his name popped up so often that I simply had to meet him. I understood immediately why people spoke about him with such affection. He's quirky and engaging in the most delightful way. 

He's well known for his work with local and international groups -  The Monkees, Tangerine Dream, Captain Matchbox, Daddy Cool, Eucalypso, Gondwanaland, Hunters & Collectors, and Madder Lake to name only a few. Among an enormous string of achievements in the entertainment industry, I was especially fascinated to read about his Warrandyte Festival light show in 1999 called River Dreaming” where the Yarra River became his canvas. 

'Dreaming' in that part of the world is something I can really relate to.

Hugh McSpeddon 2

Another local, composer and multi media artist, Andrew Garton, along with musician Chip Wardale, produced last Friday's Light Show in celebration of Hugh's work. The night culminated in a light and sound extravaganza with the group Sun Bus 5 (Andrew Garton, Chip Wardale, Kate Adam and Steve Law) providing a soundscape that grew from a combination of Andrew Garton's Drift Theory and a structured improvisation formula. 

In his introduction, Andrew's admiration for Hugh's work was palpable.

"Anyone interested in projections will want to learn from Hugh, a pioneer of light." - Andrew Garton.

See Andrew's short essay, Why is The Light Show kind of important. via this link.

The Light Show is part of the Melbourne Fringe Festival.

Hugh McSpeddon 3

Hugh McSpeddon 6 copy

The Light Show has two more nights to run at Abbotsford Convent, 1 St Heliers St Abbotsford, Victoria. 

12th. and 13rd. Oct. @ 8.00pm (2hr)

TICKETS Full: $20  Concession: $18  Group: $15

TO BOOK visit melbournefringe.com.au or call (03) 9660 9666

 All photographs in this post are ©Amanda Gibson.

 

 

Parent Category: Arts

Ruby Tuesday

Ruby Tuesday 1

Ruby Tuesday is very well known to locals as the 'go to' jeweller if you're looking for that little gift for someone special.  They've been designing, making and repairing jewellery in Warrandyte since 1998.  Now they are part of a new initiative to promote local artists and galleries called Warrandyte Arts. Spearheaded by one very enthusiastic local glass maker David Corstorphan, this little group of artists have persuaded Manningham Council to support the production of a very handy little booklet containing details about 17 artists and galleries in the area.  The books are available all over town ( I spotted some recently at the Manningham Gallery).  Some of the artists included have been featured on Isiiad, Jane AnnoisSyd Tunn  and Ona HendersonAmusing Clay,Tin Shed Gallery so click on the links to check out some more of the local talent. On presentation of the booklet you can redeem a free coffee from one of my all time favourite coffee haunts in Warrandyte, the Roundabout Cafe

Ruby Tuesday 4

Yesterday I popped in to Ruby Tuesday and snapped these little pics for your enjoyment.  Thanks to Anita Sigmund, Heidi Sigmund, Andrew Finster and Terry Rafferty for making me so welcome.  I felt a bit like a kid in a lolly shop as we arranged countless treasures for these photographs.  In addition to a gallery full of their work, they make to order and are happy to remodel existing pieces. They particularly love a creative challenge.

"We had a customer bring in tiny shells from the beach that they wanted to incorporate in a wedding ring, to remind them of a significant place."

Ruby Tuesday 13

Ruby Tuesday 6

If perchance you can't decide between this necklace or that bracelet,  Ruby Tuesday have devised a very beautiful alternative.  You can purchase one of their very fine gift tokens which allows your loved one the pleasure of making their own choice. 

Ruby Tuesday

Ruby Tuesday 2

A little 'heads up'.  While I was there, I bumped into the first artist I blogged for Isiiad, Justin Purser.  He's busy transforming the exterior of Ruby Tuesday with his own special metal worked entry and ballustrate.  I'm hoping to bring you some pics of that when it's finished in a couple of weeks.  Stay tuned.

 

 

Parent Category: Arts

Sonic Spheres

Sonic Spheres 21

Detail of TarraWarra Biennial artist Dylan Martorell’s exhibition work, Sound Tracks TarraWarra 2012, mixed media, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Utopian Slumps, Melbourne

I write my best blogs in the shower.  Words and phrases wash over me until they form themselves into sentences. This Biennial exhibition, Sonic Spheres, currently showing at TarraWarra Museum of Art has taken up a lot of my shower time lately. Two words kept bobbing up, demanding attention - avant-garde and adventure.

Sonic Spheres 35

Installation view of Sandra Selig’s work hold me in scattered light 2012, monofilament, nails, site-specific installation, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist, Milani Gallery, Brisbane and Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney.

The curator of Sonic Spheres and director of TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria Lynn, is no stranger to the avant-garde.  Her father Elwyn Lynn surrounded her with art and the avant-garde from a very early age.  No doubt conversations around the dinner table had art and ideas at their centre. When I asked her at what point she realized that she would work in the arts, I knew immediately that it was a superfluous question. She has never considered any other profession.

Here in the Yarra Valley we are all the richer for her early certainty. To prove my point, her exhibition, Sonic Spheres, successfully explores the idea that the disciplines of music, sound, visual arts and performance are indivisible. The diversity of the work exhibited is impressive, including installation, assemblage, interactive video sculpture and experimental musical notation. Nothing is predictable or as it may initially appear.  Be prepared to be challenged, because that is, after all, the job of the avant-garde.

Sonic Spheres 11

Installation view of Nathan Gray’s work Treatise (Pages 131 and 78) 2012 (based on drawings by Cornelius Cardew) wood, aluminium, stainless steel, rope and tape, 320 x 480 x 180 Courtesy of the artist and Utopian Slumps, Melbourne.

For me, this was an adventure into the unknown.  I didn’t completely understand the theory behind it, or it’s historical underpinnings until I spoke to Victoria Lynn during an interview shortly after the Biennial opened.   The penny dropped when Victoria suggested three things to keep in mind while viewing the exhibition.

1.) Think about music and sound in your own life. Think about times in your life that were quite powerful and memorable and often a sound will come to mind. It might be a song, a sound that was very disturbing, a crash. Think about memorable sonic moments and how sound can get under your skin… Embrace the fact that sound is something within all of us. That music has had an affect on all of us.

2.) Music has influenced these artists in a myriad of ways. For one artist it might be that they have dual practices. They’re in a band and they make paintings. And the two are conceptually interlinked for them. For the aboriginal artists from the show, who are from Kiwirrkura, the song cycle that has inspired the work, is an integral part of the creation of the work. So they are visually representing a set of stories and a set of songs and for them they’re completely integrated. Another artist Nathan Gray created a sculpture on the wall in response to a composer from the mid century and his sculpture during the opening was played and the same for Dylan Martorell the sculpture is actually also an instrument. So think about sculpture as an improvised form of instrumentation. So it’s a cluster of responses to sound and music. And each one will be quite different.

3.) The integration of art and sound goes way back to the early 20th Century and the Italian Futurists who wrote a manifesto called the Art of Noises where they celebrated the idea of noise. That avant-garde tradition went right through to the mid twentieth century, to the Fluxus Artists in Germany, to Nam June Paik, to John Cage and his celebration of found sound and chance experiments right through to experimentation today. There is a long and respected history of this kind of integration. It’s not a history that we’ve really seen in Australia. In Australia we tend to see Picasso and we see less of the alternative avant-garde streams, which are a bit more underground. (Quoted from an interview with Victoria Lynn on 8/8/12)

Sonic Spheres 10

Detail image of TarraWarra Biennial artist Dylan Martorell’s exhibition work, Sound Tracks TarraWarra 2012, mixed media, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Utopian Slumps, Melbourne.

With this framework in mind, I was taken through the exhibition with Victoria as my guide.  Lucky me!  I was struck by her enthusiasm and her generous, open ability to share her extensive knowledge and deep understandings.  Perhaps Sonic Spheres was working its magic, as I began to hear the dynamic melody in Victoria’s voice when she referred to the ‘etudes’ in Marco Fusinato’s work and the ‘vibrations’ and ‘refrains’ evident in other work.

By the end of our tour, my appetite for adventure was still not satisfied.   I wanted more, so snuck back to prolong the experience. I let my hair down and did the wah tootsie to activate David Haines and Joyce Hinterding’s interactive video presentation.  I marvelled at the sonic possibilities of the Goataphone and imagined the spine tingling experience of hearing one of our treasured indigenous people singing the song cycle that inspired the work of Ray James Tjangala. Finally, I allowed the haunting video, ‘Some dance to remember, some dance to forget.’ to move me to tears.

I left TWMA that day with a felt sense of the power of the avant-garde. Sonic Spheres reverberated through my being, having activated my body, mind and soul.  The following morning, I knew the whole experience had settled into place when my morning shower was taken up, not with words and phrases but with listening to the sounds of the water and playfully flicking water here, there and everywhere to see what sounds I could create. My sonic experiment built up to a crescendo with a joyous ‘splat’ into the puddle of accumulated water on the shower floor. A wild notion of adding dry pigment to the whole shower experience let me know I was going too far, but then… maybe not.

To the artists who participated in Sonic Spheres and Victoria Lynn…  Bravo for offering art lovers a breath of fresh air and a unique opportunity for adventure in the Yarra Valley.

Sonic Spheres 25

Close up (detail) view of TarraWarra Biennial artist Victor Meertens Goataphone instrument for the making of experimental sound, on which he will give a live performance the first Sunday of every month throughout the exhibition. Courtesy of the artist.

Paul Grabowsky opened TWMA’s 2012 Biennial.  I leave you with his concluding words,

“I’ve had the pleasure of working with Victoria Lynn on two Adelaide Festivals. She made an enormous impact on the art world there, demonstrating a perfect balance of charm, conviction and rigour through which she was able to bring the visual arts back into the Festival spotlight. Here at Tarrawarra she has license to realize her philosophies, her pluralism, her humanity, her vision.”

Sonic Spheres 14

TarraWarra Biennial exhibition opening visitors enjoying the view from TWMA’s North Gallery. 

Sonic Spheres closes December 9th 2012.

 

PS.  I neglected to mention that a series of performances on the first Sunday of each month enhance the sonic experience.  For details of the two remaining performances, click on this link.

Also, with the help of YouTube, readers can view recordings of live performances of exhibition artists Dylan Martorell and his installation Soundtracks TarraWarra 2012, the experimental sound group Snawklor, Nathan Gray and collaborators in A Scratch Ensemble and Victor Meertens and Alexis Ensor on the Goatafone.  

Via SoundCloud, listen to a selection of the exhibition artists’ sound art from the TarraWarra Biennial 2012: Sonic Spheres catalogue CD, it includes Marco Fusinato, Christian Thompson, Snawklor, Ross Manning, Eugene Carchesio, Victor Meertens and Alexis Ensor and A Scratch Ensemble. 

 

Parent Category: Arts

Potters Cottage: a tribute

Sylvia Halpern 1

 Sylvia Halpern© 1918 - 2008

In days gone by, Warrandyte was synonomous with the Potters Cottage (1958 - 2004). So what better exhibition to open the new Manningham Gallery than a tribute to that old Warrandyte institution. This is such a nostalgic exhibition. Apparently many visitors have expressed their delight in the opportunity it affords them to renew their aquaintance with the Potters Cottage. With an extensive collection of ceramics made by its founders, black and white footage of setting up the cottage and glass cabinets rich with photos and written material, Potters Cottage: a tribute offers a great insight into the importance of ceramics in the area.

Sylvia Halpern 4

Sylvia Halpern©

Sylvia Halpern (Deborah Halpern's mother) is well represented with birds, figures and vessels.

Sylvia Halpern 2

Sylvia Halpern©

Gus McLaren 1

Gus McLaren© 1923 - 2008

Work of Potters Cottage founders Gus McLaren, Reg Preston, Phyl Dunn, Charles Wiltom, John and Betty Hipwell and Artur Halpern, shows the diversity of what was created there.

Gus McLaren Potters Cottage 3

Gus McLaren©

Reg Preston 2

Reg Preston© (detail)

Reg Preston 6

Reg Preston©

Later ceramists have acknowledged the contribution Potters Cottage made to their arts practice.  In a catalogue accompanying the exhibition Paul Davis is quoted as saying,

Potters Cottage was 'Camelot' for us; a satellite for potters to gravitate to.  You only had to go into the gallery to see the work of practically all those who were working at that time.  For both young students - who came in cavalcades - and professionals, it was an inspiration, and a welcoming and generous place. page 131,  Potters Cottage: a tribute  by Grace Cochrane, 2012

Another later ceramist, Alexandra (Hipwell) Copeland first came to my attention through her business Weft which she runs with her husband Leigh. They sell magnificent tribal arts and textiles from Afghanistan.  I was fascinated to learn of her early exposure to ceramics at the Potters Cottage.  Her bowls in this exhibition show an exemplary use of glaze and colour.  The influence of Reg Preston, who introduced her to Italian maiolica pots is evident here. See page  134 Potters Cottage: a tribute  by Grace Cochrane, 2012 

Alexandra Copeland Potters Cottage

 Alexandra Copeland©, bowl (detail)

Alexandra Copeland Potters Cottage 1

Alexandra Copeland©, bowl (detail)

Deborah Halpern Potters Cottage

Deborah Halpern ©  

Much loved local artist Deborah Halpern has a couple of pieces in the show.  For her, Potters Cottage set the scene for a successful career in ceramics and sculpture.

Manningham Gallery

Manningham's new Gallery space.  

The new Manningham Gallery is divided into two distinct spaces. Its designers have ensured that multi media presentations can be included in exhibitions. This facility is put to good use for the Potters Cottage exhibition. Make sure that you have plenty of time when you visit this exhibition.  It's well worth taking your time and absorbing all of what's on offer.

Potters Cottage: a tribute

5th September - 10th November

Manningham Art Gallery, Manningham City Square, 687 Doncaster Road, Doncaster, Victoria.   Melway Ref: 47 F1

Gallery Hours  Tuesday - Saturday 11.00 am - 5pm.  Free Entry 

Manningham Gallery 1

 

Parent Category: Arts

Material Things

Libby ApplePickingSaints

©Libby Schrieber Apple Picking Saints, silk cut linoleum print

There's a little number that's been tucked away at the back of my wardrobe for what seems like a life time.  I remember wearing that cheeky llittle hot pink shirt to a significant dinner with a significant other.  That collection of cotton fabric, buttons and thread, assembled into a garment, has always reminded me of that moment. I haven't worn it for years but I simply can't part with it or the memory it evokes.

So no surprise that when the invite to this exhibition came across my desk, I felt compelled to go. Material Things began with Libby Schrieber's idea that clothing can tell stories. The more she thought about it, the more possibilities presented themselves.

"There's a whole world of stories and history and gender issues in what we wear."

So she gathered together three like minded print makers to add their own interpretations to her original idea. What has resulted, is a fine printmaking exhibition "exploring the use of fabric in our society".

"Libby is inspired by portraits of royalty and religious figures from the past as well as present day characters." from an email  8/10/12, M. Burton

Libby GardenAngel copy

©Libby Schrieber Garden Angel,  silk cut linoleum print

Mirranda Burton has been prominent on Isiiad's radar in the last week or so. On Wednesday 3rd of October she was the Red Chair presenter.  In addition to her  printmaking skills, she's also an accomplished animator.  So it was pretty special to see footage of that side of her work at the Red Chair.  

Given that Mirranda is presently an artist in residence at Dunmoochin, she's been revelling in having 24 hour access to Clifton Pugh's printing press.  All of the work she exhibited in Material Things was produced on that press.

M Burton material girl

©Mirranda Burton Material Girl, silk cut linoleum print

"Inspired by her experience of moving from the city to the bush. Mirranda Burton creates playful dialogues between the material and natural world." from an email 8/10/12, M. Burton

M Burton cotton fields

©Mirranda Burton Cotton Field, silk cut linoleum print

Kylie Shear Magic

©Kylie Sirett Shear Magic, silk cut linoleum print 

"Kylie’s intimate still life prints explore sewing implements, fashion accessories and furnishings from a bygone era." from an email 8/10/12, M. Burton

Kylie LookingIn

 ©Kylie Sirett Looking In, silk cut linoleum print

Maria Catherine copy

©Maria Barbaro Catherine, silk cut linoleum print

"Maria’s fluid lines echo the romantic elegance of beautiful gowns in fine silks and delicate textures." from an email 8/10/12, M. Burton

Maria TheBodice

©Maria Barbaro  The Bodice, silk cut linoleum print

The Material Girls

The four 'material girls',  clockwise left to right, Kylie Sirett, Mirranda Burton, Libby Schreiber, Maria Barbaro.

Take advantage of a unique opportunity to 'Meet the Artists',  Eltham Library Gallery, Sunday, October 21st, 2:30pm-4pm (Please note change of time from 1-3pm as previously advertised.)

Material Things  4th - 29th October 2012.  Eltham Library Community Gallery, Panther Place, Eltham.

 

 

Parent Category: Arts

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